Vogue UK Releasing Doco Showing How Damaging Photoshop Can Be

British Vogue editor Alexandra Shulman has revealed she is making a film for schools which highlights ‘the difference between fashion and reality and how a fashion image is constructed.’

It’s a bold move for the hugely popular Conde Nast publication so synonymous with high fashion, trend-setting and “The Devil Wears Prada”-esque high brow approach to body image.
Having said that, this is exactly the type of movement that we have been hoping for, for a long time. We have been putting it out there that all the big decision makers high up in all facets of the fashion industry have to be the very people creating content that will shape young impressionable minds in a positive healthy way.
The 55 year old Brit Editor says the documentary will go behind the scenes of a fashion shoot from conception to finished product with an aim to help young girls foster more positive outlooks about their body image. The focus of the documentary will be on how lighting, photoshop and airbrushing is used heavily to construct an image.
Retouching an image is the ‘icing on the cake’ according to Alexandra Shulman. Any blemishes or lines that haven’t been hidden by makeup or lighting can be removed. The body shape of the model can also be completely changed by slimming down their legs, arms and waist in seconds. However, the process has also led to some noticeable mistakes such as models appearing with missing fingers or implausibly skinny legs.
Alexandra Shulman, editor of British Vogue.
‘I’m hoping that it will be fun for students but, actually, it will make some serious points,’ Alexandra told the Independent on Sunday.

She admitted that the art of Photoshopping was only a ‘tiny part’ of the trickery used to make models look younger and slimmer.

‘It’s basically a huge team of people that go in to create the image, of which retouching is the icing on the cake. You can do far more with lighting and make-up,’ she said.

The film is currently being edited and looks to be distributed in British schools starting in August. Our hope is that this documentary will be widely available around the world, perhaps online for purchase or download.

The film, TV and beauty industry has been under heavy scrutiny for a long time when it comes to doctoring images in campaigns and magazines. As a result it fosters a thought pattern that these celebrities and models look a certain way and in turn young female (and often male) consumers look to these unrealistic role models.

It’s an important statement to make and the fact it is coming from Vogue means it will be powerful. We as the public aren’t so naive to think that there isn’t some form of editing done in magazine images, but when it is taken to an extreme where the subject is almost unrecognizable, then what is the point? Who are they aiming and and what is the end game? To sell a product to customers and continually make them feel inadequate about who they are that they will keep buying.

Here are some famous photoshopped images images of celebrities you may have already seen on the internet:

madgephotoshop

Katie Couric Photoshopped

britney photoshoppedWhat do you think about this new documentary produced by Vogue UK? Do you think it will have a positive and huge impact on the young girls who watch it?

 

 

 

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